Luis Orozco Aguilar

I have developed a novel method (less-invasive, fast and reliable) to assess the growth rates and age of urban trees. Using this method I have studied trees within Melbourne's urban forest that are up to 135 years old, healthy and growing at 2.2mm per year; which is pretty wonderful.

Urban trees are valuable assets for modern cities and they deliver important environmental and social benefits that enhance city liveability. My background is in Forestry and Agroforestry, so working with trees within an urban context now in line with my passion for crops and trees. From my point of view, urban forestry is both a challenging and rewarding research field with a promising future, particularly in Latin America.

During my PhD I have developed a novel method (less-invasive, fast and reliable) to assess the growth rates and age of urban trees. Traditional methods of dendrochronology (dating tree rings) are time-consuming; require specialized equipment and software and, ultimately; the coring points may function as potential entry courts for wood decay fungi. The development of this method is therefore important in the field of arboriculture and will improve measurements of urban tree biomass and growth. Using this method I have studied trees within Melbourne's urban forest that are up to 135 years old, healthy and growing at 2.2mm per year; which is pretty wonderful.

Luck is the intersection between preparation and opportunity, so don't give up, peruse your career, study hard and you will eventually achieve your profession.

Luis has received the Madeleine Selwyn-Smith Memorial Award and a Frank Keenan Scholarship.