Anwar Hossain

My current focus is on assessing the climate change vulnerability of freshwater invertebrates. Climate change is arguably the greatest emerging threat to the functioning of local ecosystems and in turn to global biodiversity.

The environment and its biodiversity is our natural capital. However, the way in which we are exploiting natural resources, destroying natural forests, diminishing our wildlife, and warming the global temperature no amount of money could help us in the coming future. We need to protect our environment, ecosystem and associated biodiversity through insightful research for our own well-being.

There is a growing body of literature on increased biodiversity loss; species extinction; habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation due to unsustainable use of natural resources. Anthropogenic climate change has added an extra pressure on the vulnerability of species’ existence. Historically, global biodiversity has been undervalued and its loss has been considered a negligible cost.

My current focus is on assessing the climate change vulnerability of freshwater invertebrates. Climate change is arguably the greatest emerging threat to the functioning of local ecosystems and in turn to global biodiversity. Anthropogenic climate change may disrupt species’ sensitivity (species’ inability to persist in situ), exposure (the extent to which species are exposed to changing environment), and low adaptability. All species must follow the rule of ‘adapt, migrate, or perish’. Freshwater invertebrates are particularly vulnerable to climate change because of the limited dispersability, water temperature and availability, and exposure to various anthropogenic threats.  As the apex creature on earth we have ethical reasons to save all of the species within it and leave the earth as a beautiful living place for our future generations.

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