Enrich Your Studies

Student Newsletters

Want to know what’s happening in your Faculty and around the Uni?

Our student newsletters are the best way to find out!

  • BSci-NEWS is sent fortnightly during semester to undergraduate students.
  • GradSci-NEWS is sent monthly throughout the year to graduate students.

Each newsletter contains events, workshops, scholarships, jobs, tips, opportunities, and lots more.

All current students are already included in the mailing list.
If staff would like to be sent the newsletter, please send an email

If you have anything to include in the newsletters, or you have any feedback please send an email.


Catch up on our previous newsletters:

Academic Skills

Studying at university requires you to think, write and demonstrate your knowledge in new and challenging ways. You are required to complete more independent learning, and you will need new skills to manage your study, personal and work commitments. English might be your second language, or you might have to learn new scientific or technical vocabulary.

The Academic Skills team is here to assist students to develop these new skills. There is support available through workshops and individual tutorials that will help you succeed in your degree.

You can make an appointment to see an Academic Skills Adviser through the Student Advising System, or view the various services provided by Academic Skills.

AIRport

The Academic Interactive Resources portal (AIRport) provides everything you need to know to "take off" in your course! Interactive exercises, writing tasks and specific subject help are all available. http://airport.unimelb.edu.au

Next Steps

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Next Steps is an opportunity to consider your next steps, whether you’re course planning and choosing your major, seeking employment or moving on to further study (coursework and research). Take the time to hear from staff across the university who can help you understand the different options available to you at any stage of your degree!

Get involved in our program of events in September and October 2017. Information will be available early Semester 2.

  • Tips for students at the end of first year

    You have nearly made it through your first year of the Bachelor of Science – congratulations! It really is a fantastic achievement and we hope it has been an exciting and challenging learning curve for you.

    Now that you have settled into your second semester routine, it is important to start planning for the rest of your degree, and find ways to enhance and enrich your studies with experiences that will give you additional skills and make you stand out.

    Start looking at subjects that you are interested in but are also prerequisites for major subjects that you might want to do. It can take a little while, but take the time to work through the handbook as there might be different enrolment cut-off dates for quota subjects (subjects that can only have a certain amount of students).

    The University handbook for the following year (and therefore enrolment) is released in October – it is best to get enrolled as soon as you can so you can kick back and relax over your summer holidays.

    A concurrent diploma is a great way of adding an extra qualification to your degree – and in some cases it only adds an extra 50 credit points of subjects to your degree that could be HECS exempt (i.e. you don’t have to pay for them!).

    If you are thinking of going on exchange, you will need to get onto planning soon! Applications for exchange in Semester 2 of 2017 close on Sunday, 23 October 2016. You need to attend a compulsory myWorld First Step Session before applying for exchange.

    University is not just about the academic side of things – it is also a fantastic opportunity to network and to meet people with similar interests from a diverse background. If you haven’t already, join a club or society. They are a fantastic way to make friends and take a break from your studies. It also looks great on your CV that you are involved in extracurricular activities.

    It is good to recognise that you might experience (or have already started to experience) a phenomenon known as the ‘second semester slump’. As the excitement of first semester is over and the reality of study has set in, it is completely normal to feel a bit confused about the direction that you want to take. Make sure that you speak about how you are feeling – whether it is with friends, family, academics or the University Counselling Service. There are lots of support services available to ensure you stay on track to succeed in your degree:

    END OF FIRST YEAR CHECKLIST

    • Work backwards through Handbook to pick subjects (e.g. look at majors that interest you, and check if there are any second year pre-requisites you need to complete).
    • Double check enrolment dates for quota subjects (don’t miss out!)
    • Consider a concurrent diploma
    • Plan your exchange (attend a myWorld First Step session)
    • Enrol in your 2017 subjects
    • Join a(nother!) club or society
    • Talk to people about how you are feeling to help keep your motivation
  • Tips for students at the end of second year

    You are over halfway there!

    If you are interested in further study or a career in research why not try it out first? SCIE30001 Science Research Project (or BIOM30003 Biomedical Research Project) gives students the opportunity to undertake individually supervised research to give students a taste of what honours, research masters or graduate research might be like.

    Similarly, if you are planning on heading into a career after you complete the Bachelor of Science, the SCIE30002 Science and Technology Internship gives students the opportunity to experience the workplace in an 80 – 100hour work placement during the Summer Term, Semester 1 or Semester 2. It is just like the workforce – you will need to contact potential employers and let them know (why they should let you work there?!).

    If you are considering Graduate entry courses (such as Medicine, Law or Management) there may be external entry tests that you need to undertake in order to be eligible to apply. Now is the time to start preparing and getting organised! The Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT) is sat once per year in the first half of the year, with registrations opening late in the previous year. The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is sat four times per year, and you can sit 3 times in 2 years, giving you the opportunity to improve your score. They are externally administered exams; jump online to learn more about the costs and how to adequately prepare.

    A great way of knowing whether particular graduate courses may or may not interest you is breadth subjects - make sure you try out an area (such and management or law). Have a look at all the breadth subjects there are available in the Bachelor of Science.

    Academic Skills is a great service to help improve your study skills including note taking, time management and writing essays. The service is for students of all different skill levels – it is also for students who want to finally get an H1 for an essay!

    Graduate Employment Programs can close as early as March the year before the program is offered, so if you want to go straight into the workforce make sure you spend some time seeing how to stand out from the crowd. The Melbourne Careers Centre can help you practice behavioural interviews and understand psychometric testing.

    END OF SECOND YEAR CHECKLIST

    • SCIE30001 Research Subject or opportunities
    • SCIE30002 Internship subject or opportunities
    • Graduate entry tests
    • Use breadth subjects to test subject areas
    • Meet with Academic Skills
    • Keep up to date with Graduate Employment Program deadlines and requirements
  • Tips for students at the end of third year

    You have (almost!) conquered a Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne!

    Now what? It depends on whether you are looking to go straight into employment, graduate coursework or research. Or a massive, well deserved holiday.

    The Faculty of Science and the University of Melbourne as a whole has a suite of Next Steps events, programs and workshops held in September and October to help guide you with your decisions. Take advantage of all that you are able to attend.

    (link to our Next Steps Schedule)

    If you know you really want to undertake specific further study but you don’t meet the entry requirements for your preferred program there are often alternate pathways to meet them. An example is for the Master of Science, students that don’t meet the minimum entry requirements (65% average in major subjects and/or ‘appropriate’ major subjects) students can potentially enrol in a Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate to meet entry requirements. Also don’t be discouraged if you did not go as well as you would have hoped in your undergraduate degree – almost all students perform better in any subsequent degrees than they did in their undergraduate.

    If you are stuck for what to say in your preparations for an interview or what to write on your resume, head to the Melbourne Careers Centre for assistance. Make sure you check the Handbook for all the different subjects that you have completed in order to review the ‘Learning Outcomes’ and ‘Generic Skills’ that you should now possess that you have successfully completed these subjects.

    To get a really good idea of what is out there in the job market, make sure you speak to your lecturers about jobs in specific disciplines – it could be that they have peers that have gone into industry or they themselves have not always been in academia. Make sure you join any professional associations that you are interested in.

    You will soon be part of a diverse and amazing group of alumni. Take advantage of all the benefits and opportunities that are available.

    Now is also a great time to understand ‘what employers want’ and how to articulate your skills to prospective employers. The Graduate Destination Survey in 2015 found that the top 8 skills employers are looking for are:
    1. Interpersonal and communication skills
    2. Passion
    3. Logical and technical skills
    4. Academic results
    5. Work experience
    6. Cultural alignment and values
    7. Emotional Intelligence
    8. Teamwork skills

    The Melbourne Careers Centre can help you understand how you demonstrate each of these skills through your studies.

    END OF THIRD YEAR CHECKLIST

    • Congratulatory cake and champagne – you did it!
    • Attend Next Steps sessions in September/October
    • Where there is a will, there is a way. Check alternate entry pathways
    • Speak to any many people as you can about the options available
    • Join professional associations
    • Become one of our active alumni

Volunteering and leadership

During your degree, we encourage you to participate in as many experiences as possible that will expand your academic achievements, develop your personal and professional skills, and provide chances for you to apply your knowledge and extend your learning beyond the classroom. In the job market today, employers value graduates who are well-rounded, flexible, multi-skilled and knowledgeable. They seek graduates who have transferrable skills to complement their excellent academic results, and who can contribute to their goals in varied ways.

While you are studying with us, why not take advantage of the many opportunities available for you to get involved with programs that will extend your learning opportunities, connect you to communities, and enhance your employability? Some options are listed below.

In2science - peer mentoring in schools

Are you passionate about science and maths?

In2science places university science, technology, engineering and maths students as volunteer mentors in year 8 and 9 classes at low socioeconomic schools. Mentors work as role models to encourage high school students to relate science and maths to their real lives and interests.

As a mentor you will develop your communication skills, enhance your resume, get a taste for the science/maths classroom and encourage the next generation of science students!

For more information, please email In2Science.

Leaders in Communities Award

This self-paced award allows you to gain recognition on your academic transcript of results for extra-curricular leadership and volunteering activities. Activities like these help you to develop career-related skills and build valuable professional networks.

Science Peer Mentoring Program

peer mentoring 2

Are you a first year science student?

Want to meet people and make friends in your first semester?

The Science Peer Mentoring Program is here to help! The program is designed to help first year students adjust to university life by matching you with a second or third year mentor from the Bachelor of Science. Our mentors will help you feel settled and connected, and you will get to meet other first year students as part of the program.

The program runs for 6 weeks at the start of each semester, and is open to students in their first year in the Bachelor of Science (first or second semester). You mentors will have many tips and resources to share to help you make the most of your time at university.

For international and rural students, the program is a great way of adjusting to life in Melbourne and Australia. However all first year students are welcome to join!

My mentor was really responsive and available to answer any questions. This program is really helpful.Mentee, Semester 1, 2016

Benefits for new students

  • Meet and develop friendships with other Bachelor of Science students
  • Feel immediately connected with the Melbourne University student community
  • Ask questions about everything from study, university life, cafes, clubs and societies, other social activities
  • Support and encouragement


What will your mentor do?

  • Be a friendly face at University from the start
  • Give you advice based on their own experiences
  • Assist you in making the most from your time at university
  • Refer you to resources and services available in the University community if necessary
  • Mentors are not required to provide academic help (they are not academic tutors)


What we expect from you

  • Attend meetings/catch-ups you have scheduled with your mentors
  • Maintain good communication with your mentors
  • Respect others in the program
  • Attend events that you have signed up for


Matching you to your mentor

During the first weeks of semester, we will be hosting a Welcome Event where we will aim to pair new students (mentees) to mentors studying the same or similar course or discipline (subject to the number of applicants). You will be assigned to groups with other first year students and a mentor.

How do I get involved?

Registrations for Semester 2, 2016 are now closed.

For more information about this program, and to register your interest, please email the Science Academic Engagement Team.

peer mentoring4


Becoming a Peer Mentor

Are you second year or above and interested in becoming a mentor? We’d love to hear from you. Especially if you:

  • Remember what it was like starting uni for the first time
  • Are in your 2nd year (or above) of a Bachelor of Science, or have completed a Bachelor of Science and now in a graduate course
  • Are passionate about supporting new students as they adjust to life at the University of Melbourne, and to the city itself

The best aspect of being involved in the program was being able to help out a 1st year student, and give them advice that I would have really appreciated in my first semester. Also, making friends! Mentor, Semester 1 2016.

Benefits for mentors

  • A chance to develop your interpersonal and communication skills as you guide and assist new students
  • Opportunities to develop your leadership skills and talents
  • Satisfaction of helping others
  • Boost your CV through the experience and new skills gained
  • Develop new friendships with fellow students


What we expect from you

  • Attend a group training session
  • Meet with first year mentees at least 3 times across the semester
  • Be available to answer questions via email
  • Refer mentees to resources and services available at the University


Interested?

Registrations for Semester 2, 2016 are now closed.

For more information about this program, and to register your interest, please email the Science Academic Engagement Team.

In2science - peer mentoring in schools


Are you passionate about science and maths?

In2science places university science, technology, engineering and maths students as volunteer mentors in year 8 and 9 classes at low socioeconomic schools. Mentors work as role models to encourage high school students to relate science and maths to their real lives and interests.

As a mentor you will develop your communication skills, enhance your resume, get a taste for the science/maths classroom and encourage the next generation of science students!

For more information, please email In2science or visit the In2science website.

Research Project subjects

Science Research Project SCIE30001 is intended for undergraduate students who have achieved excellent results in the discipline related to the project. You can undertake a project in several disciplines within the Faculty of Science, and undertaking a research project is a fantastic way to develop practical scientific skills. It will also provide valuable experience to students considering honours, masters or a PhD in Science.

Note: Other departments, schools or faculties may also offer research projects (you should check with the relevant department/school/faculty).

SCIE30001 Science Research Project

Before enrolling into this subject, discuss your intention with the relevant discipline coordinator Links to important information
Area of Study: The following disciplines offer enrolment in this subject. Botany Associate Professor Andrew Drinnan, School of BioSciences
Chemistry - students should consult with the School of Chemistry about enrolment in either SCIE30001 Science Research Project or the alternative subject CHEM30013 Chemical Research Project Professor Richard O'Hair, School of Chemistry
Earth Sciences Professor David Phillps, School of Earth Sciences
Ecosystem and Forest Sciences Dr Chris Weston, School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences
Genetics Associate Professor Alex Andrianopoulos,
School of BioSciences
Geography Professor Barbara Downes, School of Geography
Zoology Professor Mark Elgar, School of BioSciences  
Application process
  1. Discuss potential projects with staff in the relevant school.
  2. Complete the Science Research Project Application Form - this form must be authorised and signed by the relevant school.
  3. The form should then be submitted to Stop 1. (Enrolment Variation Form).
  4. If the application is approved, Stop 1 will enrol you in the subject and will send you confirmation.
  5. If your application is not approved, you will be notified by Stop 1.
 
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Sonia Poetrodjojo, Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry



The Science Research Project was an awesome opportunity to see what goes on in the day-to-day life of a researcher. It gave me an extra push towards further study, and I can now definitely imagine myself as a researcher.

BIOM30003 Biomedical Science Research Project

Before enrolling into this subject, discuss your intention with the relevant discipline coordinator Links to important information
Area of Study: The following disciplines offer enrolment in this subject.
Anatomy & Neuroscience Dr Gary Hime
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Dr Leon Helfenbaum 
Microbiology & Immunology Dr Odilia Wijburg
Pathology Dr Vicki Lawson 
Pharmacology & Therapeutics Assoc Prof James Ziogas 
Physiology Professor Joel Bornstein 
Vision Science Dr Larry Abel 
Application process
  1. Discuss potential projects with staff in the relevant department/school.
  2. Complete the Biomedical Science Research Project Application Form - this form must be authorised and signed by the relevant department/school.
  3. The form should then be submitted to Stop 1.
  4. If the application is approved, Stop 1 will enrol you in the subject and will send you confirmation.
  5. If your application is not approved, you will be notified by Stop 1.
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ENST30002 Land and Environment Research Project

Before enrolling into this subject, discuss your intention with the relevant departmental coordinator Links to important information
Area of Study The following departments and schools offer enrolment in this subject

Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences

Ros Gall, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences handbook_icon
Application process
  1. Discuss potential projects with staff in the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences.
  2. Complete the Land and Environment Research Project Application Form - this form must be authorised and signed by the relevant person.
  3. The form should then be submitted to the Stop 1. (Enrolment Variation Form).
  4. If the application is approved, Stop 1 will enrol you in the subject and will send you confirmation.
  5. If your application is not approved, you will be notified by Stop 1.
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Student societies and clubs

Student societies are a way to find and follow any extra curricula interests, and a great place to make new friends. Studies have shown that students involved in clubs and societies perform better academically than those who are not. The University has over 300 clubs and societies, in which students can experience and participate in areas including sport, politics, the arts and even food.

Student societies run social activities, career networks, tutorials, and many other activities and programs to assist in your overall student experience. Membership of a student society is usually based on enrolment in a course or subject, but there are also societies that are open to any University of Melbourne student.

Check out the list of clubs and societies on the Student Union website.
Check out all the Melbourne University Sport clubs on their website.

Diversity and participation is key to the learning experience. You should consider developing your extra-curricular activities by joining or even starting a club.

I’ve really enjoyed the friendly and welcoming social atmosphere and the wide variety of extra-curricular activities offered, such as student-run clubs which cater for a huge range of interests.Harriet is majoring in Zoology with a concurrent Diploma in Russian.

Study Abroad and Exchange - Global Mobility

As part of your studies at the University of Melbourne, we encourage you to undertake part of your degree overseas. By taking part in an exchange or study abroad program you can immerse yourself in a different social, cultural and intellectual milieu, with the chance to add an international perspective to your studies.

There are a number of ways you can do this. You may study overseas either as an 'exchange' student or a 'study abroad' student. With an approved study plan, either program can provide you with credit or fulfil academic requirements. There is also a wide variety of funding available to assist you with your plans for overseas study.

The University grants over 1000 Melbourne Global Scholars Awards per year. The scholarships, with a value of up to $2500 are awarded to eligible students to support their participation in Study Abroad or Exchange programs in their second or third year of undergraduate study.

To find out more, including opportunities available to current students, please visit Melbourne Global Mobility

Exchange application due dates

Semester 2, 2016: Applications are now closed
Semester 1, 2017: Applications are due Sunday 29 May 2016

Grace Gell - Bachelor of Science Grace Gell
Exchange in Semester 2, 2014 to Queen’s University Ontario, Canada

"The biggest benefit I got out of exchange was an incredible confidence in my own sense of independence and what I am really capable of if I push myself. I was the youngest one of all the exchange students by 3 years and I still managed to make so many friends from all over the world, most of whom were studying in areas I knew absolutely nothing about and had entirely different world insights."

Mishti Warrier - Bachelor of Science Mishti Warrier
Exchange in Semester 2, 2014 and Semester 1, 2015 to University College Dublin, Ireland

"My two semesters on exchange were at University College Dublin in Ireland. I studied a broad range of subjects while I was there, a few of which were Science subjects. Spending time at a different university has definitely influenced my studies now by having given me the opportunity to experience a new and exciting approach to learning and observe what university life is like in a country like Ireland. Going on exchange, without a doubt, has been the best decision I have ever made."

Industry & Careers Events

There are a number of events happening throughout the year that connect students with industry and employers, hosted by both the Faculty of Science and the wider University.

Science Career Conversations

Science Career Conversations, presented by the Faculty of Science, is a series of networking events that gives you the opportunity to hear stories, ideas and insights from industry professionals and alumni on a broad range of topics.

SciCaCo Maths and Physics

Events include:

Event Industry attendees
2016 Science Career Conversations -Entrepreneurship: New Ways of Thinking
Listen to the event
Michael Vitale - Wade Institute, Jim Grigoriou - AusIndustry & Business Foundations, Yan Ting Choong - PhD Neurophysiology, Kerry Hegarty - Research, Innovation & Commercialisation at UoM, Nick Hill and Cameron Knox - Allume Energy
2016 Science Career Conversations - Where in the world can your environmental career take you?World Wildlife Foundation, Senvion, Forest Stewardship Council, Davies Environmental Group, ARUP
2016 Your PhD and beyond - Strategies for Surviving and (Career) ThrivingNatalie Lundsteen (PhD, Ed.; University of Oxford, U.K.) - Director of Graduate Career Development, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, United States.
2016 Science Career Conversations - Discover where your maths and physics skills can take youDeloitte, Biarri, Bureau of Meteorology, IBM, Jane Street, Maths Pathways, Optiver
2015 Out of the Lab - Discover where your science and maths skills can take you
Listen to the event
Optiver, Merck Millipore, Teach for Australia, Victorian Government, PwC
2015 Career Lab - Consultancy, Sustainable Business and Accountability
Listen to the event 
Ernst & Young, Moreland Energy Foundation, Arup, Brett Lane & Associates, Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning, Environmental Protection Agency 
2015 Career Lab - The Road to Commercialisation
Listen to the event 
CSL, Hatchtech, Phillips Ormonde Fitzpatrick, UoM Commercial, Burnet Institute 
2015 Science Festival - Keynote Address Margaret Wertheim (science communicator, writer and journalist)
2015 Career Lab - Greening Cities for Climate Change Mitigation  VicRoads, City of Melbourne, Urban Environmental Design, 3000 Acres, RBG Cranbourne, CoDesign, NGIV, School of Ecosystem & Forest Sciences (UoM) 
2015 Careers in STEM - RhD and Masters Techstaff Group, Geomatics Technologies, Davies Collison Cave, Department of Infastructure Engineering (UoM), Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Grannus Securities Pty Ltd

The fact that the university had organised this panel gave me the opportunity to find out about Optiver and network with their representatives, which ultimately led to my employment with that company - Jonathan, BSc (Operations Research)

Melbourne Careers Centre

Melbourne Careers Centre hosts events and fairs for all students throughout the year, as well as providing workshops and career-building services. The workshops can help to assist with your planning across all stages of your degree, and explore ways to gain experience in your field of interest. The centre also provide a Career Express Drop In Service to receive feedback on job applications or talk about any career queries.

Keep up to date on current opportunities for Science students here.

A full list of Semester 2 events, plus registration information, is also available.